Thursday, 6 April 2017

Beer quality - 2 out of 3 ain't bad

Quality counts
The recently-published Beer Quality Report 2017 shows us where the dirtiest pints are pulled in the country: it's in the South West where 40.8% of pints were pulled through unclean lines. The best area was the North East with 29%, which represents 3 pints in every 10, which I'd say is still too high.

A North-South divide is apparent in England, with the North East, the North West and Yorkshire in the top three, and the results getting worse the further south you go. This would seem to reinforce the Northern stereotype about Southern beer.

Poor beer quality is a major issue, one that too many licensees don't take seriously enough; according to these figures, across the country, a lot of pints sold - more than 1 out of 3 - are substandard. Quality is something that beer blogger Tandleman, among others, often bangs on about, and he's completely right. Most people, faced with a substandard pint, will tend to leave it, walk out and not come back: one bad pint can result in the loss of dozens of future sales. I wrote last year in greater length about beer quality here.

It's not as though beer is cheap: at more than £3 a pint, it isn't. In 1972, bitter was 13p a pint where I lived. Adjusted for inflation using the Bank of England calculator, that's £1.57 today. There are various factors that have caused the price of beer to increase at double the rate of inflation in the intervening years, but wages certainly haven't risen at the same rate during that period. In terms of the spending power of ordinary people, beer in pubs is much dearer than it used to be. Drinkers deserve better for their hard-earned cash.

Unclean beer lines - breakdown by region 
  • 29% - North East 
  • 31.3%  - North West 
  • 31.6% - Yorkshire  
  • 31.8% - East Midlands 
  • 33% - West Midlands
  • 34.3% - Scotland 
  • 35.8% - London 
  • 37.3 % - East England 
  • 38.1% - Home Counties  
  • 38.8% - South East 
  • 39% - Wales  
  • 40.8% - South West 
These figures relate to cider, stout, premium lager, standard lager, keg beer and real ale.
The Beer Quality Report is compiled using information from Cask Marque and Vianet.

3 comments:

  1. And dirty keg lines are even more of a problem than dirty cask lines!

    Despite what some think, keg beer isn't a "fit and forget" product.

    ReplyDelete
  2. good god

    you really are better off with a can of cheap lager at home.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hate to say this, but you have a point.

      Delete

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